Lobster boat

This half model is typical of the semi displacement lobster hull. When thinking of a semi displacement hull, consider only the hull shape from the water line down. It’s the part that displaces the water. The half model shows the deep V bow in the front of the boat that does push through and ‘displace’ water. This gives the boat some of the stability of a full displacement hull. The back half of the lobster boat flattens out and has a tendency to ride up on the water and attempt to plane. This gives the boat some of the characteristics of a planing hull thus more speed than a displacement hull.

Lobster boats hulls styles have been around for a long time. They have gotten wider and engines became much more powerful.

I hand carved these models in the same manner as they were years ago. These are made of local pine, typical of what was used. The water line is depicted to show where the boat would float in the water. They are approx. 12.5 inches long and about 2 1/4 inches deep. The mounting boards are 16 inches long by 10 inches high.

 

Muscongus Bay Sloops

The Muscongus Bay sloop is the predecessor of the famous Friendship sloop. They were a working class sail boat used to lobster, and to transport lobster from the islands to the mainland. They were very seaworthy and fisherman were able to handle the boats and lobster quite easily.

Again like the lobster boat half models, I carved these from pine and added the waterline so show where the boat would sit in the water. The models are approx. 14 inches long and about 2 1/4 inches deep. The mounting boards are 16 inches long by 10 inches high.

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